Tag: income tax

Portland Has Highest Income Taxes in the U.S. Are We Getting Our Money’s Worth-cm

Portland Has Highest Income Taxes in the U.S.: Are We Getting Our Money’s Worth?

By Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

This year, Oregon passed a major milestone. In 2020, Portland became the city with the highest personal income taxes in the United States.

The news was delivered this week in testimony to the Oregon Legislature. The State Tax Research Institute reported that state and local income taxes in Portland total nearly 14% — a rate that’s higher than San Francisco or New York.

That means the average Portland resident must work almost two months just to pay their state and local taxes.

Are we getting our money’s worth? It sure doesn’t seem like it.

  • Do we have great schools? No. We have the fifth worst graduation rate in the country.
  • Do we have flourishing businesses? No. Over the past few years it seems more businesses are leaving than arriving.
  • A lot of our taxes go to the Oregon Health Plan. Do we have great health care? According to U.S. News and World Report, our state ranks near the bottom in adult and child wellness visits as well as child dental visits.

Now that we have record shattering tax rates, it’s time for us to ask: When will we get our money’s worth?

Eric Fruits, Ph.D. is Vice President of Research at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research center.

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Winter is coming the homeless need shelter and the expo center has the space-cm

Winter Is Coming, the Homeless Need Shelter, and the Expo Center Has the Space

By Eric Fruits. Ph.D.

Winter is coming to Oregon, and it might be a rough one. As if the pandemic, riots, and a recession weren’t enough, the Northwest is looking at La Niña weather conditions that will bring us a cold, wet winter. While most of us will tough it out in our warm homes, thousands of unsheltered homeless will be stranded on the streets or in camps, unless we make better use of the resources we have.

In November 2016, Portland voters approved a $260 million bond measure to build more affordable housing in the city. Two years later, Metro voters approved a $650 million affordable housing bond. Combined, the measures promised to build more than 5,200 units of affordable housing throughout the region. Currently, only 51 units have been completed.

This year, the region’s voters approved Metro’s two new income taxes to provide “supportive housing services” to the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless. The taxes are anticipated to bring in approximately $250 million a year. During the campaign, proponents claimed, “We know what works, it’s just a matter of scale.” They say what works is a “Housing First” approach providing thousands of units of permanent affordable housing along with a wide range of support services for those placed in housing.

To be blunt, no one knows what works, and there appear to be no economies of scale. For more than two decades, the Housing First approach has been heralded as the best solution. But, these projects take years to build and construction costs per unit are more than double private sector costs. The “wrap around” services are expensive and require individuals to have the ability and intent to fully use them. Even worse, there is no evidence that the Housing First approach is effective at reducing the total number of unsheltered people in a community.

Observers and experts concluded Portland and Multnomah County’s emphasis on a Housing First approach diverted money away from emergency shelter beds. Housing redevelopment projects before and after the Great Recession replaced single-room occupancy apartments and low-cost motel rooms with high-end apartments and condominiums. Put simply, there are not enough beds to support all the homeless in the region. Local governments’ slow-motion construction of affordable housing units can’t satisfy existing demand, let alone keep up with future demand.

With winter approaching and an unknown end to the pandemic, the region needs thousands of emergency shelter beds now. Fortunately, the region has a facility that is well suited to house thousands of people in such an emergency.

The Portland Expo Center is a 330,000-square-foot exposition center sitting on 53 acres. The Expo Center is owned and operated by Metro. The facility has meeting rooms, a full-service kitchen, a restaurant, and flexible outdoor exhibit space. The facility has been losing money for years and needs significant capital upgrades to compete in the exposition market.

The exhibition space alone could serve 2,000 to 3,000 individuals. Its 2,500-vehicle parking lot provides ample space for individuals who prefer to camp or sleep in vehicles. It is located away from residential and commercial areas, but also has easy access to public transit—the TriMet Yellow Line terminates at the front of the Expo Center and provides frequent service to downtown Portland.

Because the pandemic effectively closed the Expo Center, Metro should work with other local governments to immediately open the Expo Center as a temporary emergency homeless shelter. Repurposing an existing exposition center would be much less expensive than Metro and the City of Portland’s current “affordable housing” construction projects. Over time, Metro can use its Supportive Housing Services funds to redevelop the Expo Center into a permanent emergency and/or transitional housing shelter providing services to those in need.

Converting the Expo Center could bring immediate relief to thousands of homeless individuals and families while providing a much better return on investment than current plans to remodel the site for low-attendance expositions. If we’re truly all in this together, it’s time to put the Expo Center to work.

Eric Fruits, Ph.D. is Vice President of Research at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization, and an adjunct professor at Portland State University, where he teaches courses in urban economics and regulation. He can be reached at eric@cascadepolicy.org. A version of this article was published in the Portland Tribune on November 22, 2020.

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Reject Ordinance 20-1449-cm

Press Release: Eric Fruits, Vice President of Research at Cascade Policy Institute, urges Metro Council to reject Ordinance 20-1449

October 4, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Eric Fruits, Ph.D.
(503) 242-0900
eric@cascadepolicy.org

PORTLAND, Ore. – On Thursday, October 1, Cascade Policy Institute’s Vice President of Research, Dr. Eric Fruits, testified before the Metro Council, urging them to reject Ordinance 20-1449. The ordinance would authorize the sale of up to $28 million in revenue bonds. The funds would be used to implement, impose, and collect Metro’s new personal and business income taxes.

Fruits also pressed the Council to delay implementation of Metro’s Supportive Housing Services income taxes scheduled to go into effect January 1, 2021.

“Metro has completely misplaced its priorities,” Fruits says. “Instead of focusing on its core obligations, it has spent the last two years expanding its mission by chasing expensive new programs funded with new and increasing tax burdens on its constituents.

“The Council must step back from the messes it has made for itself and Metro as a whole. It should spend the next two years recovering from the pandemic’s financial hit and focusing on the organization’s mission, not its mission creep.”

Cascade Policy Institute’s Vice President of Research, Dr. Eric Fruits, testified before the Metro Council

Click here to read Eric Fruits’ full testimony.

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Contact Dr. Eric Fruits by email at eric@cascadepolicy.org for more information or to schedule an interview.

About Cascade Policy Institute:

Founded in 1991, Cascade Policy Institute is Oregon’s free-market public policy research center. Cascade’s mission is to explore and promote public policy alternatives that foster individual liberty, personal responsibility, and economic opportunity. For more information, visit cascadepolicy.org.

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Metro Deep in Debt and Getting Deeper-cm

Metro: Deep in Debt and Getting Deeper

The regional government plans to borrow money to implement its new income taxes

By Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

Hardly a week goes by that Metro isn’t reaching into your pocketbook or getting deeper in debt. This week, Metro will move forward on issuing $28 million in bonds.

Why does Metro need to borrow $28 million? There are two reasons.

First, Metro needs the money because that’s how much it’s going to cost to set up its new system to collect TWO new income taxes that go into effect in the New Year. We warned you it would be expensive to implement two new taxes on short order. But, even we had no idea it would cost a whopping $28 million. It takes a lot of money to take a lot of money.

Believe it or not, the second reason is even worse. Metro is out of money.

Since Lynn Peterson began leading Metro, the regional government has more than quadrupled its debt load and now has more than $1 billion in debt.

And that’s where the problems really are. Metro has never brought in enough money to cover its expenses. Out of control spending combined with reduced revenues because of the pandemic have worsened its shortfall.

As a result, Metro is under enormous pressure to raise more money from taxes, fees, and charges. They’ve dug us into a hole, and the only way they can fill it is with our tax dollars.

Eric Fruits, Ph.D. is Vice President of Research at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research center.

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Percent Symbol Flying in City-cm

Higher Taxes, Less Business

By Cooper Conway

Joe Rogan, the outspoken commenter, comedian, and host, announced on a recent episode of his popular podcast, “The Joe Rogan Experience,” that he would be moving to Texas in search of less homelessness, less taxes, and a little bit more freedom.

Rogan will be bringing his business that recently signed a 100-million-dollar deal with Spotify, too. The move to the Lone Star state will save Rogan and his company over $13 million in taxes and provide more economic growth for the state that is the perennial winner of the Governor’s Cup for economic growth and job creation.

Unlike California, Texas has no income tax and frequently poaches businesses from the West Coast, such as Tesla, Charles Schwab, and McKesson.

Oregon, whose top income tax rate is slightly under California’s at 10 percent, should note the multiple businesses fleeing California for Texas and follow Texas’s tax policy lead instead of California’s.

Amid a pandemic, now more than ever is the time for economic development and job creation to flood Oregon, allowing Oregonians to succeed. The implementation of free-market solutions such as lower-income taxes will alleviate local business owners from the damage that COVID has done while allowing more Oregonians to rejoin the workforce.

Cooper Conway is a Research Associate at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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Calculator-And-Pen-On-Receipt-cm

Oregon Legislator to Oregon Business: “Let ‘em Leave!”

By Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

“Let ’em leave. Someone else’ll come in.” That was Oregon state senator James Manning’s response when told that new business taxes will cause some firms to leave the state.

Unfortunately, the senator is not alone with the let-them-leave attitude. That seems to be the attitude of the supermajority in the legislature as well as the city of Portland, who have both recently passed massive business taxes.

The legislature just passed a billion dollar a year “corporate activities tax.” The new tax is triggered once a business hits one million dollars in sales. This may seem like a lot to a legislator; but many small businesses such as restaurants, retailers, and consulting firms can easily generate a million dollars in sales. In fact, the Census Bureau reports about a quarter of Oregon employers have sales of a million or more a year. Thousands small firms will be subject to thousands of dollars in new sales taxes on top the income taxes they already pay.

Last year, Portland voters approved their own tax on business revenues, with money earmarked for so-called clean energy projects. Firms who thought they were exempt are now learning that they, too, will face a steep tax bill.

These new taxes will be a good test of Senator Manning’s let-them-leave theory, as owners look to other states for a better business environment. However, I’m not confident someone else will come in to replace the ones that leave.

Eric Fruits, Ph.D. is Vice President of Research at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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6-12-19-Oregon_Legislator_to_Oregon_Business_“Let_‘em_Leave!”PDF

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