Disinherited: How Washington Is Betraying America’s Young

Cascade Policy Institute

presents

Disinherited: How Washington Is Betraying America’s Young

Jared Meyer

Jared Meyer

 

Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

Author of Disinherited: How Washington Is Betraying America’s Young

 

For Millennials, achieving success will be more difficult than it was for young Americans in the past. This is because Washington made decisions that render their lives more difficult than those of their parents or grandparents. Too many public primary and secondary schools are failing their students, college graduates are saddled with heavy debt burdens, and labor market restrictions keep young Americans from building their careers. Meanwhile, Washington expects Millennials to pay higher taxes for government entitlement and health care programs that benefit middle-aged and older Americans, most of whom have better jobs and more assets. It is time to address the crisis facing America’s young. The future of America can be saved, but only if Washington’s betrayal comes to an end.

This special event is a critical talk for Millennials, Gen Xers, Baby Boomers, and the Greatest Generation. Jared Meyer is a fantastic, engaging young speaker. His presentation is designed to bring all the generations together to promote a path to preserving our American way of life for years to come. Bring your kids; bring your grandkids; young adults, bring your grandparents!

Jared Meyer is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. His research interests include microeconomic theory and the economic effects of government regulations. Meyer is the coauthor along with Diana Furchtgott-Roth of Disinherited: How Washington Is Betraying America’s Young (Encounter Books, May 2015). His research has been published in numerous publications, including The Wall Street Journal, Yahoo! Finance, RealClearPolitics, City Journal, and New York Post. Meyer has appeared on numerous radio and television shows, including the BBC World Service, NPR, Fox News, and CSPAN. He received a B.S. in finance and a minor in the philosophy of law from St. John’s University in New York. Follow him on Twitter @JaredMeyer10.

 

$25 ticket price includes a delicious Italian Buffet:

salad, two pasta choices, entree, bread, coffee, tea or soda

No-host bar (cash only)

Event Sponsors

Cascade Policy Institute

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Cascade Policy Institute is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Donations are tax deductible and accepted with gratitude.

“Public Provisions” Pitfalls

Christina Martin
Cascade Commentary

“Public Provisions” Pitfalls

By Christina Martin

Download PDF Here

Nobody likes physical pain, but often it gives us a signal that we need to change our behavior before we incur serious injury. In the sphere of social policy, government entitlements designed to avoid short-term pain too often work against natural and healthy incentives that help individuals to avoid longer-term pain. Many people will endure smaller temporary pains, work harder, save more, eat healthier and build a social network in order to avoid larger future pains like hunger or homelessness. This is not a new observation and has been commented on for thousands of years.

Our nation’s founders were well aware of the importance of incentives. In 1766 Benjamin Franklin declared in a letter to the London Chronicle that England’s poor were the most miserable in the world because England’s welfare programs had destroyed essential incentives, making people dependent on the government. He concluded after his world travels that “the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer,” but “the less [that] was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

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