Policy Picnic – March 18, 2015


Please join us for our monthly Policy Picnic led by Cascade board member & President of Turbo Leadership Systems Larry W. Dennis, Sr. & Cascade Publications Director Kathryn Hickok


Topic: 15 Leadership Principles and Ronald Reagan

Description:

Championing change is never easy. It requires vision, communication skills, and the courage to act as the fearful stand on the sidelines. By following Ronald Reagan’s example, you can change your world and inspire the next generation.

Please join Larry and Kathryn, author and co-author of the book, “15 Leadership Principles and Ronald Reagan”, as they discuss their book, Ronald Reagan and how you can become a better communicator and leader.

Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event.

Admission is free. Please feel free to bring your own lunch.
Coffee and cookies will be served. 
 
Sponsored by:
Dumas Law Group

Policy Picnic – November 19, 2014

Please join us for our monthly Policy Picnic led by Cascade President & CEO John A. Charles, Jr.

Topic: Alternatives to the Proposed Portland Street Tax

Description: The Portland City Council seems determined to enact a new tax to pay for basic road maintenance. In this seminar, we will discuss why such a tax is unnecessary, and what the city should do to maintain and improve the road system.

Admission is free. Please feel free to bring your own lunch. Coffee and cookies will be served.

Space is limited, so sign up early!

 
Sponsored by:
Dumas Law Group

Dissing Online Education

One can imagine that blacksmiths and buggy whip makers didn’t take kindly to the automobile revolution that started in the late 19th century. Those at risk of losing their horse-related jobs likely made the case for resisting the new, glitchy, and dangerous metal machines. We all know how that rivalry turned out.

Today, another revolution is beginning. Just as thousands of years of horse travel were largely replaced within a few decades, one wonders what the future of physical classroom education might be in the face of the online education revolution.

A Portland State University professor of educational leadership recently authored an op-ed making the case that “effective teaching practices such as class discussion, relational learning and other activities of the traditional classroom are hard to offer on a computer screen.” That might be true; face-to-face educational interactions may never go away, but soon they could be greatly supplemented or even overshadowed by online innovation.

The future is always daunting to those at risk of being displaced, but the future is coming and we will find ways to adapt to it and even improve upon it. Buggy whips may be a thing of the past, but there are still plenty of jobs for people who know how to make and care for our modern horseless carriages.

Executive Club

Redder or Bluer?

GMO Marijuana?

Same bathrooms for the top 2?

Drivers licenses for alien judges in digital camo?

Time for the postmortem! Postpartum?

Let’s hear from the band

Eric Winters, Lindsay Berschauer, and Gregg Clapper

singing their a cappella hit single

Oregon Election 2014

The election is coming!: A discussion of Oregon’s 7 statewide ballot measures

Please join us for Cascade’s monthly Policy Picnic led by founder and senior policy analyst Steve Buckstein on October 22, at noon.

There are seven statewide ballot measures on Oregon’s General Election ballot. Cascade has taken positions on two of them: Yes on Measure 91 to decriminalize marijuana, and No on Measure 86 to direct more tax money into subsidizing certain higher education students. Come join us in a conversation about the latest election-related issues – we’d love to hear your opinion!

Admission is free. Please bring your own lunch. Coffee and cookies will be served. Space is limited to sixteen guests on a first come, first served basis, so sign up early.

Sponsored By

Why Literature Lovers Hate Common Core

Please join us for Cascade’s monthly Policy Picnic led by publications director Kathryn Hickok on September 17, at noon.

Kathryn will discuss reasons many teachers say the Common Core State Standards are taking the language out of language arts and the love out of literacy. Common Core supporters argue the new standards will improve students’ literacy, but will they do the opposite instead? What can parents do about it?

Admission is free. Please bring your own lunch. Coffee and cookies will be served. Space is limited to sixteen guests on a first come, first served basis, so sign up early.

Sponsored By

Sustainability Is Fine, Unless There’s Nothing Left to Sustain

The University of Oregon may hire four new “hot shot” sustainability professors whose mission will be to “change the world by figuring out how to rebuild and reorganize cities…to account for climate change, population growth and environmental damage.”

Worthy goals, no doubt. But remember what the blind longshoreman philosopher Eric Hoffer had to say about the role of cities in civilization:*

“I’ve found that everything creative comes from the city. All men’s theories and great achievements―they were not realized in the bracing atmosphere of forests and steppes and mountaintops, but in the crowded, stinking cities! NOTHING OF IMPORTANCE HAS EVER COME FROM THE VILLAGE—how could anything be invented in places where strangers are not welcome?Man becomes human in the city; without the city, man would have been nothing…And, of course, it’s in the cities that man decays, too. America will die if we don’t know how to run viable cities.”

But, Hoffer wouldn’t trust “hot shot” professors to solve our city’s problems. Here’s what he had to say about such men:

“I AM AFRAID OF SCHOOLTEACHERS AND INTELLECTUALS—I THINK THEY MAKE THE WORST TYRANTS IN THE WORLD, AND THEY NEVER HAVE ANY UNDERSTANDING OF THE MASSES.”

Hoffer saw business as “the sphere that most of the energy and ambition and talent in America gravitated toward.” But, then he saw the “social landscape in America…started to tilt away from business, and the rewards offered to intellectuals…loomed higher and higher.”

“Hot shot” professors may be smart; but they won’t create the goods and services we need to truly sustain our lives, liberty, and happiness. For that, we need a vibrant business climate, and I see nothing in the “hot shot’s” job description that allows for that.
* All Eric Hoffer quotes are from Eric Hoffer: An American Odyssey, by Calvin Tomkins, EP Dutton, 1968


 

Steve Buckstein is founder and Senior Policy Analyst at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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