QuickPoints!

New Orleans’ Miracle School District

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina devastated the southeastern United States, displacing more than 372,000 school-aged children. Today, New Orleans’ school population has returned to more than two-thirds its pre-storm level, but a lot has changed for the better in the public school district. Before Katrina, a Louisiana state legislator called New Orleans “one of the […]

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Employee Freedom Respects Workers’ Choice

Why might workers like the opportunity to opt out of union membership? Some believe they can make better use of their own money rather than giving it to a union. Others “vote with their feet” against what they perceive to be poor union service or negotiating results. Still others leave because they oppose their unions’ […]

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Taxpayers Ultimately Get the Bill for Oregon’s Medicaid Expansion

By Thomas Tullis Thirty states have already undertaken the Medicaid expansion encouraged by the Affordable Care Act. In Oregon, more than one in 4 people are now enrolled in Medicaid. Enrollment is nearly twice as high as originally thought, and now lawmakers are looking at a half-billion-dollar state deficit after grossly miscalculating the projection. In […]

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The Extinction of Public Transit

By Emma Newman Uber and Lyft have recently gained over 50 percent of the taxi market in Portland. This is especially notable as Portland was initially hostile to ridesharing companies, to the point of filing a lawsuit against Uber late last year. This industry takeover is just one example of how private market innovation has […]

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Restore the Trust in State Trust Lands

By Anna Mae Kersey When Oregon joined the Union, the U.S. Congress granted it control of State Trust Lands, public lands managed by the state to support public education in perpetuity through the Common School Fund. Currently, 96 percent of Oregon’s remaining State Trust Lands show no signs of generating revenue within five to ten […]

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Will “Free” Tuition Make College Cost More?

By Thomas Tullis On July 17, Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 81, the “Oregon Promise” legislation that allocates $10 million to a “free” community college tuition program for Oregon students. With college tuition having increased ten-fold over the last three decades, Oregon lawmakers clearly have good intentions, but that doesn’t make the Oregon Promise […]

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Nevada’s Education Innovation

By Emma Newman According to the U.S. Department of Education, Oregon’s 2013 graduation rate is the worst of all 49 states which reported data. Nevada, which held Oregon’s position at the bottom in 2012, has decided to do something truly bold and create a system that allows for unprecedented levels of accountability, opportunity, and individualization […]

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“Right to Try” Is a Good First Step, Should Be Expanded

By Anna Mae Kersey Oregon House Bill 2300 gives terminally ill patients access to potentially life-saving drugs or investigational products not yet approved by the FDA that they might otherwise die waiting for. While the necessity of such a bill is largely uncontroversial, and since last year more than 20 states have passed similar legislation, […]

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How the State of Oregon Gambles Away Its Lottery Proceeds

By Thomas Tullis When Oregon politicians pretend to be experts on venture capital investing, it ends up costing the state millions of dollars in education money. This is exactly what is going on with the Oregon Growth Board, a project of the Oregon Business Development Department. Tasked with generating a return on investment by financing […]

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Does PCC-Sylvania Need a Light Rail Tunnel?

By Emma Newman Metro and TriMet are jointly considering an expansion of the light rail system to PCC-Sylvania in SW Portland, by building a tunnel to the campus from Barbur Boulevard. The tunneling would have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood, forcing many homeowners to move away while still requiring PCC students to make […]

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