Is TriMet Better Off Than Greece?

Syndicated financial writer Malcolm Berko recently advised a small investor to stay away from Greek bonds or securities. He wrote, “Greece has morphed into a bureaucratic five-star welfare state; but in reality, Greece is a one-star economy. The pensions and entitlements consume 52 percent of government income.” Well, TriMet’s most recent audited financial statement was […]


Scaling Down: The Power of One

Is it truly possibly for one person to make a positive difference in education in America? Darla Romfo has a good answer to this question. She is president of the Children’s Scholarship Fund, which has helped more than 145,000 low-income children nationwide to attend private grade schools. She wrote: “[Children’s Scholarship Fund founder] John [Walton] […]


The Minimum Wage Conversation Never Ends

Oregon and some other states mandate that their minimum wage increase every year with the Consumer Price Index. Based on that formula, last Wednesday it was announced that Oregon’s minimum wage, the second highest in the country at $9.25 an hour, will stay unchanged in 2016. That same evening during the Republican presidential debate, one […]


Tilikum Crossing: More Punishment for Motorists

The new bridge over the Willamette River, TriMet’s Tilikum Crossing, opened for business on Saturday. With beautiful weather and parties at every stop of the Orange MAX line, a good time was had by the thousands of sightseers. Unfortunately, now that we’ve returned to gray skies and normal weekday travel, it’s clear that the bridge […]


What Gets Kids “Ready for College and Life?”

Students across Oregon are back in school. Have you ever thought about how important it is where a child goes to school? After their family, the greatest influence on children as they grow up is usually their school. Private scholarship programs like the Children’s Scholarship Fund-Portland help elementary children from lower-income families choose the school […]


New Orleans’ Miracle School District

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina devastated the southeastern United States, displacing more than 372,000 school-aged children. Today, New Orleans’ school population has returned to more than two-thirds its pre-storm level, but a lot has changed for the better in the public school district. Before Katrina, a Louisiana state legislator called New Orleans “one of the […]


Employee Freedom Respects Workers’ Choice

Why might workers like the opportunity to opt out of union membership? Some believe they can make better use of their own money rather than giving it to a union. Others “vote with their feet” against what they perceive to be poor union service or negotiating results. Still others leave because they oppose their unions’ […]


Taxpayers Ultimately Get the Bill for Oregon’s Medicaid Expansion

By Thomas Tullis Thirty states have already undertaken the Medicaid expansion encouraged by the Affordable Care Act. In Oregon, more than one in 4 people are now enrolled in Medicaid. Enrollment is nearly twice as high as originally thought, and now lawmakers are looking at a half-billion-dollar state deficit after grossly miscalculating the projection. In […]


The Extinction of Public Transit

By Emma Newman Uber and Lyft have recently gained over 50 percent of the taxi market in Portland. This is especially notable as Portland was initially hostile to ridesharing companies, to the point of filing a lawsuit against Uber late last year. This industry takeover is just one example of how private market innovation has […]


Restore the Trust in State Trust Lands

By Anna Mae Kersey When Oregon joined the Union, the U.S. Congress granted it control of State Trust Lands, public lands managed by the state to support public education in perpetuity through the Common School Fund. Currently, 96 percent of Oregon’s remaining State Trust Lands show no signs of generating revenue within five to ten […]