Last week Cascade released a report encouraging cities and counties to consider leaving TriMet due to its financial mismanagement.

TriMet has long admitted that its labor costs are unsustainable. In addition, the agency’s addiction to costly rail construction has cannibalized bus service, which has been cut by 14% in the past five years.

Comparison with other local transit districts paints a stark picture. The cost per mile of operation for the TriMet commuter rail line is $43.74. TriMet’s flagship service, light rail, costs $11.96 per mile. Yet, the small city of Sandy runs its own bus service for $2.57 per mile.

TriMet predicts that additional service cuts will be required by 2017 and every year thereafter to balance the budget, which essentially would shut down the agency by 2025. TriMet’s only strategy has been to seek contract concessions from the bargaining unit representing most workers, but this is unlikely to succeed. The ongoing PERS crisis shows that once management agrees to expensive fringe benefits for unionized workers, it’s almost impossible to reduce them later.

TriMet is in a death spiral of its own making. Local jurisdictions might be hoping for the best, but they should plan for the worst. Leaving TriMet is an option that needs to be on the table.

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. 

 

2 Responses to “As TriMet Sinks, Should Portland Suburbs Go Down With the Ship?”

  1. Jared January 17, 2014 at 5:31 pm #

    Tri-Met and others act like buses are so bad, but the problem with rail lines is that they can only go certain place, and where they are chosen to go is critical. Thus, people who are forced to use public transit do not have a choice about where to go. I ride the MAX nearly daily, and often there are mishaps, but the train cannot reroute, and it’s a logistical nightmare. Buses can reroute, and they do not require such expensive infrustructure. It’s a shame that buses get stigmatized by ignorant people who probably don’t even take public transit.

    Additionally, the behavior on the MAX can be quite bad, especially east of the Gateway/99th transit stop.

  2. Bob Clark January 18, 2014 at 9:09 am #

    I wonder if TriMet’s managers haven’t actually nefariously adopted a “Too-Big-to-Fail” strategy so as to get a mega-sized State bailout.

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