A 2005 law which requires Oregonians to get a doctor’s prescription to use cold and allergy medicines containing pseudoephedrine has not significantly reduced meth lab incidents, made the illegal drug methamphetamine harder to get or reduced the number of people using it. What it has done is impose a considerable burden on legitimate users of medicines like Claritin-D and Sudafed. Anyone considering such a law in other states should read this study and avoid Oregon’s mistakes.

The study was conducted by Chris Stomberg, Ph.D., a Partner, and Arun Sharma, a Principal, in the Antitrust and Competition, and Healthcare practices at Bates White, LLC, an economic consulting firm based in Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full report.
Click here to read the press release summary of the report.

 

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  1. Strict Meth Laws Hurt Consumers, Have Little Effect on Meth Supply - Political Schmooze - February 21, 2012

    […] According to a new report published by the Cascade Policy Institute in Portland, the law hasn’t been nearly as successful as its proponents claim. The report was funded by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, a trade group that represents the manufacturers of over-the-counter medications. But the data are compelling. […]

  2. Study: Oregon's Peudophedrine Laws Aren't Doing Much Good - Ever Becoming, Never Completed - February 21, 2012

    […] per box to the meth cooks for $40 or $50.The Consumer Healthcare Products Association funded the report by the Cascade Policy Institute but the results aren’t exactly shocking news. Anyone who […]

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